Episode 42: What Does the Canada-US-Mexico Trade Agreement Mean for Digital Policy?

October 28, 2021 00:26:36
Episode 42: What Does the Canada-US-Mexico Trade Agreement Mean for Digital Policy?
Law Bytes
Episode 42: What Does the Canada-US-Mexico Trade Agreement Mean for Digital Policy?
/

Show Notes

The ratification of the Canada – US- Mexico Trade Agreement has captured considerable attention with several committees studying Bill C-4, the bill aimed at ratifying the deal. Over the past month, I’ve had the opportunity to appear before two of those committees – the House of Commons Standing Committee on International Trade and on Industry, Science and Technology – where I discussed the digital law and policy implications the agreement. This week’s podcast features excerpts from those appearances, including my opening statement and the ensuing discussion with several MPs on copyright term extension, cultural policy, and privacy.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Credits:

Global News, USMCA Tops Agenda When Canadian Parliament Resumes
Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, February 24, 2020
Standing Committee on International Trade, February 19, 2020

Episode Transcript

No transcript available...

Other Episodes

Episode

October 28, 2021 00:35:49
Episode Cover

Episode 55: Mutale Nkonde on Racial Justice, Bias, and Technology

The world has been focused for the past several weeks on racial justice and the Black Lives Matter movement, with millions around the world taking to the streets to speak out against inequality and racism. Technology and concerns about racism and bias have been part of the discussion, with some of the world’s leading technology companies changing longstanding policies and practices. IBM has put an end all research, development and production of facial recognition technologies, while both Amazon and Microsoft said they would no longer sell the technology to local police departments. Mutale Nkonde is an artificial intelligence policy analyst and a fellow at both the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and at Stanford University’s Digital Civil Society Lab. She joins me on the podcast this week from a busy home in Brooklyn, NY to talk about this moment in racial justice and technology, racial literacy, and the concerns about bias in artificial intelligence The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod. Show Notes: Daniels, Nkonde and Darakhshan, Advancing Racial Literacy in Tech Credits: France 24 English, Black Lives Matter Movement Gains Momentum Worldwide with Fresh Weekend of Protests “Coded Bias”: New Film Looks at Fight Against Racial Bias in Facial Recognition & AI Technology ...

Listen

Episode

September 20, 2021 00:43:08
Episode Cover

Episode 101: OpenMedia's Laura Tribe on Digital Policy and the 2021 Canadian Election

It is election day in Canada following a late summer campaign in which the focus was largely anything but digital issues: COVID, climate change, Afghanistan, and affordability all dominated the daily talking points. The digital policy issues that grabbed attention throughout the spring – Bill C-10, online harms, wireless pricing – were largely absent from the discussion and in some cases even from party platforms. Laura Tribe, the executive director of OpenMedia, joins the Law Bytes podcast to discuss digital policies and the 2021 election campaign. Our conversation walks through a wide range of issues, including the surprising omission of wireless pricing from the Liberal platform, the future of Bill C-10, and the failure of privacy reform to garner much political traction. The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod. Credits: Global News, Canada Election: How are the Parties Planning to Tackle Cellphone Affordability ...

Listen

Episode

October 28, 2021 00:34:36
Episode Cover

Episode 58: "An Earth Shattering Decision" - Marina Pavlovic on the Supreme Court of Canada's Uber v. Heller Ruling

The Supreme Court of Canada recently released its much anticipated Uber Technologies v. Heller decision, a landmark ruling with significant implications for the validity of online contracts and for employment relations in the gig economy. The court rejected an arbitration clause in an Uber contract with its drivers, finding the clause unconscionable. The decision unsurprisingly quickly caught the attention of many in the legal, technology, business, and consumer advocacy communities. Professor Marina Pavlovic is a friend and colleague at the University of Ottawa, who appeared before the Supreme Court representing the Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic as an intervener in the case. She joined me on the podcast to discuss the decision and to explain why she believes it is an earth shattering ruling for online contracts in Canada. The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod. Show Notes: Uber Technologies v. Heller Credits: CBC News: The National, Supreme Court Rules in Favour of Uber Drivers, Opening Door to Lawsuit ...

Listen