The LawBytes Podcast, Episode 36: The Year in Canadian Digital Law and Policy

October 28, 2021 00:34:18
The LawBytes Podcast, Episode 36: The Year in Canadian Digital Law and Policy
Law Bytes
The LawBytes Podcast, Episode 36: The Year in Canadian Digital Law and Policy
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Show Notes

The past year has been an incredibly active one for Canadian digital law and policy with important Supreme Court cases, legislative proposals, committee reports, expert panels, and political promises to reform existing laws and regulation. For this final Lawbytes podcast of 2019, I go solo without a guest to talk about the most significant trends and developments in Canadian digital policy from the past year and think a bit about what may lie ahead next year. I focus on five issues: the “euro-fication” of Canadian digital policy, the debate over the competitiveness of the Canadian wireless market, the many calls for privacy law reform, the future of Canadian copyright reform, and the review of Canadian broadcast and telecom law.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Ian R. Kerr Memorial Fund – the Kerr Fellows
Ministerial Mandate Letters
Prioritizing Competition: Navdeep Bains Tries to Flip Canada’s Telecom-Policy Script
From Innovation to Regulation: Why the Liberals Have Lost Their Way on Digital Policy
The Authoritative Canadian Copyright Review: Industry Committee Issues Balanced, Forward-Looking Report on the Future of Canadian Copyright Law

Credits:

Global News, Justin Trudeau Speaks on Canadians Detained in China, Combating Online Hate
BNN Bloomberg, High Wireless, Data Costs in Canada ‘Have a Drag’ on the Economy: Expert
Canadian Press, Privacy Commissioner Calls for New Measures to Protect Personal Information
House of Commons, June 3, 2019
CBC News, Ottawa’s Fight with Netflix Reignites Age-Old Debate

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