Episode 98: Kim Nayyer on the Supreme Court of Canada's Landmark Access Copyright v. York University Copyright Ruling

October 19, 2021 00:37:47
Episode 98: Kim Nayyer on the Supreme Court of Canada's Landmark Access Copyright v. York University Copyright Ruling
Law Bytes
Episode 98: Kim Nayyer on the Supreme Court of Canada's Landmark Access Copyright v. York University Copyright Ruling
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Show Notes

The Supreme Court of Canada recently brought a lengthy legal battle between Access Copyright and York University to an end, issuing a unanimous verdict written by retiring Justice Rosalie Abella that resoundingly rejected the copyright collective’s claims that its tariff is mandatory, finding that it had no standing to file a lawsuit for copyright infringement on behalf of its members, and concluding that a lower court fair dealing analysis that favoured Access Copyright was tainted. The decision removes any doubt that the Supreme Court remains strongly supportive of user’s rights and vindicates years of educational policy in shifting away from Access Copyright toward alternative means of ensuring compliance with copyright law.

Kim Nayyer is the Edward Cornell Law Librarian, Associate Dean for Library Services, and Professor of the Practice at Cornell Law School. She appeared before the Supreme Court in this case, representing the Canadian Association of Law Libraries as an intervener. She joins the Law Bytes podcast to talk about the case and its implications for the future of copyright, education, and collective rights management.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Access Copyright v. York University

Credits:

Supreme Court hearing, Access Copyright v. York University

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