Episode 94: Former CRTC Vice Chair Peter Menzies Reflects on the Battle over Bill C-10

October 19, 2021 00:39:38
Episode 94: Former CRTC Vice Chair Peter Menzies Reflects on the Battle over Bill C-10
Law Bytes
Episode 94: Former CRTC Vice Chair Peter Menzies Reflects on the Battle over Bill C-10
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Show Notes

The Liberal government strategy to push through Bill C-10 bore fruit last week as the controversial Broadcasting Act reform bill, received House of Commons approval at 1:30 am on Tuesday morning. Bill C-10 proceeded to receive first reading in the Senate later that same day and after a series of Senate maneuvers, received second reading from Senator Dennis Dawson the following day. That sparked Senate debate in which everyone seemed to agree that the bill requires significant study and should not be rubber-stamped. Speeches are likely to continue on this week after which the bill will be sent to committee. Given that the committee does not meet in the summer, an election call in the fall would kill Bill C-10.

Peter Menzies is a former Vice-Chair of the CRTC and one of the most outspoken experts on Bill C-10. He joins the Law Bytes podcast to reflect on the last two months of the Bill C-10 debate, discuss the limits of CRTC regulation, and explore what comes next.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Peter Menzies, Bill C-10: Control-Freak Ottawa Confronts the Future. And the Future is Losing

Credits:

House of Commons, June 21, 2021

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