Episode 89: A Special Episode on Debating Bill C-10 at the Canadian Heritage Committee

October 28, 2021 00:34:15
Episode 89: A Special Episode on Debating Bill C-10 at the Canadian Heritage Committee
Law Bytes
Episode 89: A Special Episode on Debating Bill C-10 at the Canadian Heritage Committee
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Show Notes

With yesterday’s Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage meeting with experts on Bill C-10 and its implications for freedom of expression, this is a special Law Bytes episode featuring my opening statement and engagement with Members of Parliament. The discussion canvassed a wide range of issues including how regulating user generated content makes Canada an outlier worldwide, the impact on net neutrality, and why discoverability requirements constitute speech regulation. There is a second post that features my opening statement to the committee.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Credits:

Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, May 17, 2021

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