Episode 87: What You Need to Know About Bill C-10

October 19, 2021 00:23:27
Episode 87: What You Need to Know About Bill C-10
Law Bytes
Episode 87: What You Need to Know About Bill C-10
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Show Notes

This past week Bill C-10, Internet free speech, and the government’s digital policy agenda went mainstream as a lead topic in government, the media, and among many Canadians. This week’s Law Bytes podcast departs from the standard format as I explain why the bill has suddenly become a hot topic, how the government has been inconsistent and at times incoherent in its attempts to justify the bill, and why the concerns regarding freedom of speech and CRTC over-regulation are absolutely justified.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Credits:

House of Commons, May 5, 2021
House of Commons, November 18, 2020
Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, April 23, 2021
CBC News, User-Generated Content Exemption Was ‘Not Necessary’: Guilbeault
Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, May 6, 2021
CTV News, Question Period, May 9, 2021

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