Episode 86: CCLA's Cara Zwibel on the Free Speech Risks of Bill C-10 and the Guilbeault Internet Plan

October 19, 2021 00:27:34
Episode 86: CCLA's Cara Zwibel on the Free Speech Risks of Bill C-10 and the Guilbeault Internet Plan
Law Bytes
Episode 86: CCLA's Cara Zwibel on the Free Speech Risks of Bill C-10 and the Guilbeault Internet Plan
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Show Notes

The public debate on Bill C-10 recently took a dramatic turn after the government unexpectedly removed legal safeguards designed to ensure the CRTC would not regulate user generated content. The resulting backlash has left political columnists comparing Canada to China in censoring the Internet, opposition MPs launching petitions with promises to fight back against the bill, and Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault struggling to coherently answer questions about his own bill.

Cara Zwibel is the Director of the Fundamental Freedoms Program at the Canadian Civil Liberties Association and one of Canada’s leading experts on freedom of expression. She joins the Law Bytes podcast to talk both about Bill C-10 and the free speech risks that may come from another bill that Guilbeault has been discussing that could include website blocking, a social media regulator, and mandated Internet takedowns.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Credits:

CBC News, User-Generated Content Exemption Was ‘Not Necessary’: Guilbeault

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