Episode 78: Jennifer Jenkins on What Copyright Term Extension Could Mean for Canada

October 28, 2021 00:32:47
Episode 78: Jennifer Jenkins on What Copyright Term Extension Could Mean for Canada
Law Bytes
Episode 78: Jennifer Jenkins on What Copyright Term Extension Could Mean for Canada
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Show Notes

For years, Canada resisted extending the term of copyright beyond the international standard of life of the author plus 50 years. That appears to have come to an end with the USMCA, which requires an extension. The Canadian government has just launched a public consultation on the issue, identifying several “accompanying measures” to address concerns about the negative impact of term extension. For the many Canadians that participated in the recent copyright review process, the consultation document comes as huge disappointment as it seemingly rejects – with little legal basis – the review’s recommendation on establishing a registration requirement for the additional 20 years that would benefit both creators and the public.

The consultation is currently open until March 12th. Duke University’s Jennifer Jenkins, who is is a Clinical Professor of Law teaching intellectual property and Director of Duke’s Center for the Study of the Public Domain, joins the Law Bytes podcast this week to help sort through the likely implications of copyright term extension for Canada.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Government of Canada Copyright Term Extension consultation – Due March 12, 2021

Government of Canada Copyright Term Extension Consultation Paper

Credits:

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, February 24, 2020

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