Episode 77: The Complexity of Internet Content Regulation - A Conversation with CIPPIC's Vivek Krishnamurthy

October 28, 2021 00:37:47
Episode 77: The Complexity of Internet Content Regulation - A Conversation with CIPPIC's Vivek Krishnamurthy
Law Bytes
Episode 77: The Complexity of Internet Content Regulation - A Conversation with CIPPIC's Vivek Krishnamurthy
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Show Notes

Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault seems set to table another bill that would establish Internet content regulations, including requirements for Internet platforms to proactively remove many different forms of content, some illegal and others harmful or possibly even “hurtful.” Few would argue with the proposition that some regulation is needed, but venturing into government regulated takedown requirements of otherwise legal content raises complex questions about how to strike the balance between safeguarding Canadians from online harms and protecting freedom of expression.

Vivek Krishnamurthy, is a colleague at the University of Ottawa, where he is the Samuelson-Gluschko Professor of Law and serves as the director of CIPPIC, the Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic. He joins the Law Bytes podcast to talk about the complexities of Internet content regulation and the risks that overbroad rules could stifle expression online and provide a dangerous model for countries less concerned with online civil liberties.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Credits:

Global News, Justin Trudeau Speaks on Canadians Detained in China, Combating Online Hate

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