Episode 76: Higher Consumer Costs and Less Choice - My Appearance Before the Heritage Committee on Broadcasting Act Reform

October 28, 2021 00:16:26
Episode 76: Higher Consumer Costs and Less Choice - My Appearance Before the Heritage Committee on Broadcasting Act Reform
Law Bytes
Episode 76: Higher Consumer Costs and Less Choice - My Appearance Before the Heritage Committee on Broadcasting Act Reform
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Show Notes

The Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage last week started what it is calling a pre-study on Bill C-10, the Broadcasting Act reform bill. The hearings raises some significant procedural concerns given that the bill has not yet passed second reading so the committee is technically conducting a study about the bill, rather than studying the bill itself. Moreover, committee members have indicated that they have already been invited to provide potential amendment to a bill that hasn’t even made it out to committee, much less been the subject of any study.

Despite those qualms, I was pleased to be invited to appear before the committee and discuss some of the concerns that I’ve identified with the bill. This week’s podcast features my opening statement and the full exchanges that I had with Conservative MP Keven Waugh and Liberal MP Marcie Ian. The audio isn’t ideal, but I hope that the recordings give a sense of both the policy concerns with the bill and the kinds of questions being asked.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

The Broadcasting Act Blunder, Day 20: The Case Against Bill C-10

Credits:

Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, February 5, 2021

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