Episode 75: The Digital Taxman Cometh

October 28, 2021 00:29:59
Episode 75: The Digital Taxman Cometh
Law Bytes
Episode 75: The Digital Taxman Cometh
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Show Notes

Digital tax policy has emerged as major issue around the world. Canada is no exception. Late last year, the Canadian government announced plans to act on all three fronts: Bill C-10 seeks to address mandated Cancon payment and Finance Minster Chrystia Freeland has promised digital sales taxes by July and what sounds like a digital services tax in 2022.

What is a DST and how might Canada’s digital tax plans play out on the international front?  I spoke with Georgetown University professor Itai Grinberg, a leading expert on cross-border taxation and digital tax issues on December 15, 2020, shortly after the government’s announcement. He joined the Law Bytes podcast to talk about the longstanding approach to multi-national tax policy and the emerging challenges that come from the digital economy.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Grinberg, International Taxation in an Era of Digital Disruption: Analyzing the Current Debate

Credits:

CityNews Toronto, HST/GST on Digital Purchases to Pay for Pandemic Recovery

Episode Transcript

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