Episode 74: Heidi Tworek on the Challenges of Internet Platform Regulation

October 28, 2021 00:28:30
Episode 74: Heidi Tworek on the Challenges of Internet Platform Regulation
Law Bytes
Episode 74: Heidi Tworek on the Challenges of Internet Platform Regulation
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Show Notes

The Law Bytes podcast took a breather over the holidays and into early January, but there seemingly is no break for digital policy issues. Over the past few weeks, Internet platforms have found themselves squarely in the public eye as company after company – from Shopify to Twitter to Facebook de-platformed former US President Donald Trump in response to the events in Washington earlier this month. Dr. Heidi Tworek of the University of British Columbia is one of Canada’s most prolific thinkers on Internet platform policies. She joins the podcast for a conversation about the role and responsibilities of Internet platforms, proposals for payments in the news sector, and insights what governments should be doing about better communicating with the public about the COVID-19 global pandemic.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Tworek, The Dangerous Inconsistencies of Digital Platform Policies

Tworek, Is News Property? How Digital Platforms are Resurrecting a Centuries-Old Question

Credits:

NBC News, President Trump Permanently Banned from Twitter

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