Episode 72: Emily Laidlaw on the Good, the Bad, and the Missed Opportunities Behind Canada's Privacy Reform

October 28, 2021 00:33:45
Episode 72: Emily Laidlaw on the Good, the Bad, and the Missed Opportunities Behind Canada's Privacy Reform
Law Bytes
Episode 72: Emily Laidlaw on the Good, the Bad, and the Missed Opportunities Behind Canada's Privacy Reform
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Show Notes

Canada’s new privacy bill is only a couple of weeks old but it is already generating debate in the House of Commons and careful study and commentary from the privacy community. As the biggest overhaul of Canada’s privacy rules in two decades, the bill will undoubtedly be the subject of deep analysis and lengthy committee review, likely to start early in 2021. Last week’s Law Bytes podcast featured Navdeep Bains, the Innovation, Science and Industry Minister, who is responsible for the bill. This week, Professor Emily Laidlaw of the University of Calgary, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Cybersecurity Law, joins the podcast with her take on the good, the bad, and the missed opportunities in Bill C-11.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify, Youtube or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

 

Show Notes:

Laidlaw, AB Lawg: Canada’s Proposed New Consumer Privacy Protection Act: The Good, the Bad, the Missed Opportunities

Credits:

CTV News, Government Introduces Privacy Bill

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