Episode 69: Bram Abramson on the Government's Plan to Regulate Internet Streaming Services

October 28, 2021 00:41:18
Episode 69: Bram Abramson on the Government's Plan to Regulate Internet Streaming Services
Law Bytes
Episode 69: Bram Abramson on the Government's Plan to Regulate Internet Streaming Services
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Show Notes

Last week, Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault introduced Bill C-10, legislation that would significantly reform Canada’s Broadcasting Act. A foundational part of what he has called a “get money from web giants” legislative strategy, the bill grants new powers to the CRTC to regulate online streaming services. Bram Abramson is one of Canada’s leading communications law lawyers and managing director of a new digital risk and rights strategy firm called 32M. Bram acted as an outside consultant on telecom regulation for the recent Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review panel – often called the Yale Report –  but he joins the podcast to talk about the past, present and future of broadcast regulation, in particular what Bill C-10 could mean for the regulation of online streaming services.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Credits:

CPAC, Heritage Minister Discusses Bill to Update Broadcasting Act – November 3, 2020

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