Episode 68: Mike Pal on What the Canadian Experience Teaches About the Intersection Between Election Law and the Internet

October 28, 2021 00:30:38
Episode 68: Mike Pal on What the Canadian Experience Teaches About the Intersection Between Election Law and the Internet
Law Bytes
Episode 68: Mike Pal on What the Canadian Experience Teaches About the Intersection Between Election Law and the Internet
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Show Notes

The world will be focused on the United States this week as the U.S. Presidential election is slated to take place on Tuesday, November 3rd. The role of social media has been in the spotlight in the US for months with calls for regulation, a range of responses from the major companies, and ongoing concerns about the immediate aftermath of the election and fears that their platforms could be weaponized if the winner is in dispute.

Canada had its own national election one year ago and enacted a range of reforms designed to address some of these issues. Mike Pal is a colleague at the University of Ottawa where he specializes in election law. He joins the Law Bytes podcast to discuss the Canadian experience including what changes were made, whether they were effective, what more can be done, and what Canada might teach others about confronting the challenges that lie at the intersection between elections and the Internet.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Michael Pal, Social Media and Democracy: Challenges for Election Law and Administration in Canada

Credits:

CTV News, Facebook is “Clear and Present Danger’ to Democracies: Technology Analyst

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