Episode 67: Tamir Israel on Facial Recognition Technologies at the Border

October 28, 2021 00:31:15
Episode 67: Tamir Israel on Facial Recognition Technologies at the Border
Law Bytes
Episode 67: Tamir Israel on Facial Recognition Technologies at the Border
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Show Notes

Facial recognition technologies seem likely to become an increasingly commonplace part of travel with scans for boarding passes, security clearance, customs review, and baggage pickup just some of the spots where your face could become the source of screening. Tamir Israel, staff lawyer at CIPPIC, the Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic at the University of Ottawa, recently completed a major study on the use of facial recognition technologies at the border. He joins me on the LawBytes podcast to discuss the current use of the technologies, how they are likely to become even more ubiquitous in the future, and the state of Canadian law to ensure appropriate safeguards and privacy protections.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Facial Recognition at a Crossroads: Transformation at our Borders and Beyond

Credits:

Washington Post, Your Face is Now Your Boarding Pass, Here’s Why that Should Worry Us

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