Episode 59: "It's a Racist Policy" - Ben Cashdan on the U.S. Effort to Derail South Africa's Copyright Reform

October 28, 2021 00:28:26
Episode 59: "It's a Racist Policy" - Ben Cashdan on the U.S. Effort to Derail South Africa's Copyright Reform
Law Bytes
Episode 59: "It's a Racist Policy" - Ben Cashdan on the U.S. Effort to Derail South Africa's Copyright Reform
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Show Notes

South Africa spent years embroiled in a high profile effort to update its copyright law responding to concerns from creators, the education community, and the visually impaired that the longstanding laws did not serve the national interest and were harming creativity and access to knowledge. Its Parliament ultimately passed progressive reforms in 2019, but the bill languished on the desk of President Cyril Ramaphosa, who faced enormous trade pressures from the United States and European Union to not sign the bill and stop it from becoming law. Last month, he seemingly caved to the pressure, citing constitutional concerns in sending it back to the Parliament.

Ben Cashdan is a South African documentary film maker and television producer who was active during the copyright reform process. He worked with Recreate ZA, which brought together a broad coalition of creatives, to advocate for both the interests of owning copyright in their own works, and in fairly using copyrighted materials in the creation of new works He joins me on the podcast this week to discuss the decade-long reform process, the external pressures, and explains why he thinks those pressures should be viewed as racist policies.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Credits:

SABC News, Various Groups Call for Signing of the Copyright Amendment Bill

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