Episode 52: Fair Dealing for Film Makers - Bob Tarantino on the Copyright Implications of the Room Full of Spoons Case

October 28, 2021 00:28:00
Episode 52: Fair Dealing for Film Makers - Bob Tarantino on the Copyright Implications of the Room Full of Spoons Case
Law Bytes
Episode 52: Fair Dealing for Film Makers - Bob Tarantino on the Copyright Implications of the Room Full of Spoons Case
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Show Notes

Dubbed by some as the worst film ever made, The Room has become a cult-like film classic. Written, directed, produced and starring Tommy Wiseau, the movie was the subject of the 2017 film The Disaster Artist and a documentary titled Room Full of Spoons by Canadian documentary filmmakers who wanted to tell the story of the film and its popularity. The documentary has been the subject of years of litigation with Wiseau at one point obtaining an injunction to stop its release.

The Ontario Superior Court of Justice recently released an important decision in the case with significant implications for creators involving copyright, fair dealing, moral rights, and a host of other legal issues. Bob Tarantino, Counsel at Dentons Canada LLP, joins me on the podcast this week to discuss why the decision will be welcome news for documentary filmmakers.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Wiseau Studio, LLC v. Harper
Tarantino, Room Full of Spoons: The Contributions of Wiseau Studio v. Harper to Canadian Entertainment Law

Credits:

The Room, IMDBB page

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