Episode 4: Going Inside Canada's Copyright Review

October 20, 2021 00:27:51
Episode 4: Going Inside Canada's Copyright Review
Law Bytes
Episode 4: Going Inside Canada's Copyright Review
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Show Notes

The House of Commons Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology has spent the past year reviewing the state of Canadian copyright law. The review, which is scheduled to result in a report with recommendations for potential reforms, featured hundreds of witnesses representing a wide range of views. To introduce some of the issues and provide some insight into how the review process functions, this week’s LawBytes podcast relies on the audio recording of my committee appearance in December 2018.  It opens with my seven minute opening statement and continues with several exchanges with MPs on issues such as fair use, the USMCA, crown copyright, and anti-circumvention rules, which are often referred to as digital locks.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Episode Notes:

The State of Canadian Copyright: My Copyright Review Appearance Before the Industry Committee

Credits:

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, December 10, 2018
House of Commons, November 29, 2018
CBC Power and Politics: Copyright Modernization Act
CityNews Toronto: Bryan Adams Fights for Artists’ Copyright Laws
iFixit Video: DMCA on the Farm

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