Episode 26: There Is No Crisis - Dwayne Winseck on the State of Canadian Communications, Media and Cultural Policy

October 22, 2021 00:32:13
Episode 26: There Is No Crisis - Dwayne Winseck on the State of Canadian Communications, Media and Cultural Policy
Law Bytes
Episode 26: There Is No Crisis - Dwayne Winseck on the State of Canadian Communications, Media and Cultural Policy
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Show Notes

The future of Canadian communications law has emerged as political hot potato in recent weeks with political parties engaged in finger pointing over who is acting – or failing to act – on issues closely aligned to cultural policy. Just prior to the election call, Dwayne Winseck, a professor at Carleton who has been one of Canada’s most prominent experts on communications and cultural policy, joined the podcast to provide his take on the initial report from the Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review Panel, the tech-lash against companies such as Google and Facebook, and what the numbers tell us about the state of media and advertising in Canada.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Canadian Media Concentration Research Project

Credits:

In the House: Why Do They Not Make Them Pay Their Fair Share?

Episode Transcript

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