Episode 145: Why Bill C-18’s Mandated Payments for Links is a Threat to Freedom of Expression in Canada

November 07, 2022 00:27:30
Episode 145: Why Bill C-18’s Mandated Payments for Links is a Threat to Freedom of Expression in Canada
Law Bytes
Episode 145: Why Bill C-18’s Mandated Payments for Links is a Threat to Freedom of Expression in Canada
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Show Notes

The hearings on the Online News Act – Bill C-18  - wrapped up last week with a final session in which I had the unexpected opportunity to appear and again raise concerns with the bill. My focus this time was on how the bill mandates payments for links and why that approach is a threat to freedom of expression in Canada. This week’s Law Bytes podcast takes you inside the hearing room as it features my opening statement and clips from exchanges with MPs from several parties that touched on everything from innovation to copyright reform to the rules for final offer arbitration.

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