Episode 135: Co-Chair Emily Laidlaw on the Work of the Government's Expert Advisory Group on Online Safety

July 18, 2022 00:47:42
Episode 135: Co-Chair Emily Laidlaw on the Work of the Government's Expert Advisory Group on Online Safety
Law Bytes
Episode 135: Co-Chair Emily Laidlaw on the Work of the Government's Expert Advisory Group on Online Safety
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Show Notes

Canadian Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez created an Expert Advisory Group on Online Safety earlier this year to help craft a potential legislative and policy response to online safety and harms issues. The panel recently concluded its work and though the media focused on a failure to achieve absolute consensus from a group that by design had different views, the reality is that common ground was found on several key issues. Emily Laidlaw, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Cybersecurity Law at the University of Calgary, served as co-chair of the expert group. She joins the Law Bytes podcast to talk about how the panel functioned, where it found consensus, areas of disagreement, and what could come next for one of the thorniest Internet policy issues.

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