Episode 132: Ryan Black on the Government's Latest Attempt at Privacy Law Reform

June 27, 2022 00:45:02
Episode 132: Ryan Black on the Government's Latest Attempt at Privacy Law Reform
Law Bytes
Episode 132: Ryan Black on the Government's Latest Attempt at Privacy Law Reform
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Show Notes

Parliament is now on break for the summer, but just prior to heading out of Ottawa, the government introduced Bill C-27. The privacy reform bill that is really three bills in one: a reform of PIPEDA, a bill to create a new privacy tribunal, and an artificial intelligence regulation bill. What’s in the bill from a privacy perspective and what’s changed? Is this bill any likelier to become law than an earlier bill that failed to even advance to committee hearings? To help sort through the privacy aspects of Bill C-27, Ryan Black, a Vancouver-based partner with the law firm DLA Piper (Canada), joins the Law Bytes podcast to discuss everything from changes to consent requirements to how the law will be enforced.

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