Episode 131: The Bill C-11 Clause-by-Clause Review - What “An Affront to Democracy” Sounds Like

June 20, 2022 00:26:25
Episode 131: The Bill C-11 Clause-by-Clause Review - What “An Affront to Democracy” Sounds Like
Law Bytes
Episode 131: The Bill C-11 Clause-by-Clause Review - What “An Affront to Democracy” Sounds Like
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Show Notes

Last week, the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage rushed through the clause-by-clause review of Bill C-11 in a manner that should not be forgotten or normalized. Despite the absence of any actual deadline, the government insisted that just three two hour sessions be allocated to full clause-by-clause review of the bill. Once the government-imposed deadline arrived at 9:00 pm, the committee moved to voting on the remaining proposed amendments without any debate, discussion, questions for department officials, or public disclosure of what was being voted on. This week’s Law Bytes podcast features clips from a hearing that one Member of Parliament described as “an affront to democracy”.

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