Episode 128: Morghan Fortier on Why Canada's Most Successful Youtube Streaming Company Is Worried About Bill C-11

May 30, 2022 00:48:25
Episode 128: Morghan Fortier on Why Canada's Most Successful Youtube Streaming Company Is Worried About Bill C-11
Law Bytes
Episode 128: Morghan Fortier on Why Canada's Most Successful Youtube Streaming Company Is Worried About Bill C-11
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Show Notes

Last week, the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage started its hearings on the Online Streaming Act with the first of four day-long sessions it has planned for witnesses. Morghan Fortier, the co-founder and CEO of Skyship Entertainment, stole the show that day with insights that demand to be heard. Her company may not be a household name, but it’s Canada’s leading Youtube streaming service with millions of subscribers worldwide and billions of views. She joins the Law Bytes podcast to talk about her company, the challenges and opportunities for Canadians in online streaming, and her sector’s concerns with the government’s Bill C-11 legislative plans.

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