Episode 127: Lucie Guibault on Canada's Approach to Copyright Term Extension

May 02, 2022 00:26:41
Episode 127: Lucie Guibault on Canada's Approach to Copyright Term Extension
Law Bytes
Episode 127: Lucie Guibault on Canada's Approach to Copyright Term Extension
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Show Notes

Last week, the government took another step toward copyright term extension in Canada, inserting extension provisions within Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland’s Budget Implementation Act bill.  Despite recommendations from its own copyright review, students, teachers, librarians, and copyright experts to include a registration requirement for the additional 20 years of protection, the government chose to extend term without including protection to mitigate against the harms.

Lucie Guibault is an internationally renowned expert on international copyright law, a Professor of Law and Associate Dean at Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University, and the Associate Director of the school’s Law and Technology Institute. Days before the release of the bill, she joined the Law Bytes podcast for a discussion on copyright term extension, its implications and the government’s implementation options.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Bill C-19, Budget Implementation Act
Canadian IP Scholars Copyright Term Extension consultation submission
Canadian IP Scholars Public Letter on Budget 2022 – Copyright Law Amendments

Credits:

Standing Committee on Industry, Science and Technology, February 24, 2020

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