Episode 117: Fight for the Future's Sarah Roth-Gaudette on Web 3 Regulation and Alternatives to Big Tech

February 14, 2022 00:31:05
Episode 117: Fight for the Future's Sarah Roth-Gaudette on Web 3 Regulation and Alternatives to Big Tech
Law Bytes
Episode 117: Fight for the Future's Sarah Roth-Gaudette on Web 3 Regulation and Alternatives to Big Tech
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Show Notes

The interest in regulation and Web 3.0, the umbrella term for all matters crypto, continues to grow in countries around the world. In Canada, a new private member’s bill encourages the government to establish a regulatory framework to support innovation even as concerns mount over the use of cryptocurrency to by-pass conventional payments regulations. In the United States, there have been multiple Congressional hearings and proposals for legislative action.

Fight for the Future
was one of many leading digital civil liberties groups that included Access now, Article 19, EFF, and Global Voices, that recently came together to issue a public letter in support of alternatives to big tech and to approach legislation related to Web 3 technologies carefully. Sarah Roth-Gaudette, the Executive Director of Fight for the Future, joins the Law Bytes podcast to talk about Web 3, the regulatory initiatives, and the issues that are at stake.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

In Support of Alternatives to Big Tech

Credits:

Yahoo Finance, Key Takeaways From the Capitol Hill Hearing with Crypto CEOs

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