Episode 116: Is This Podcast a Program Subject to CRTC Regulation Under Bill C-11?

February 07, 2022 00:36:12
Episode 116: Is This Podcast a Program Subject to CRTC Regulation Under Bill C-11?
Law Bytes
Episode 116: Is This Podcast a Program Subject to CRTC Regulation Under Bill C-11?
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Show Notes

The government’s Internet regulation plans were back on the agenda last week as a “what we heard report” was released on online harms and Bill C-11 – the sequel to last year’s controversial Bill C-10 – was introduced by Canadian Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez. The Law Bytes podcast will devote several episodes to the bill in the coming months. For this week, however, rather than inviting a guest to discuss a bill that people are still assessing, I appear solo and walk through the bill’s provisions involving user generated content. The podcast also highlights several ongoing concerns involving the near-unlimited jurisdictional scope of the bill, the considerable uncertainty for all stakeholders, the misplaced trust in the CRTC, and the weak evidentiary case for the bill.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Bill C-11, The Online Streaming Act

Credits:

Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez Discusses Government’s Online Streaming Bill, February 2, 2022

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