Episode 114: The Citizen Lab's Ron Deibert on Protecting Society from Surveillance Software

January 24, 2022 00:35:09
Episode 114: The Citizen Lab's Ron Deibert on Protecting Society from Surveillance Software
Law Bytes
Episode 114: The Citizen Lab's Ron Deibert on Protecting Society from Surveillance Software
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Show Notes

The Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto, led by Professor Ron Deibert, has a well-earned reputation for uncovering surveillance technologies and security vulnerabilities with research and reports that attract immediate attention worldwide. Professor Deibert has won an incredible array of awards and accolades for his remarkable work, including the Order of Ontario and the EFF’s Pioneer Award. In 2020, he delivered the Massey Lectures, based on his book for the lectures, Reset:  Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society. Professor Deibert joins the Law Bytes podcast to talk about the lab, his work, and the threat of what he calls “despotism as a service”, where spyware is used to target journalists, activists, and civil society groups.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Issues in Science and Technology, Protecting Society From Surveillance Spyware

Credits:

DW News, Hacking Backdoor? Security Flaws in China’s Mandatory Olympics App

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