Episode 111: The Story Behind JusTech - How Three University of Ottawa Law Students Created a Technology Compliance Solution for Privacy Breach Rules

December 06, 2021 00:26:29
Episode 111: The Story Behind JusTech - How Three University of Ottawa Law Students Created a Technology Compliance Solution for Privacy Breach Rules
Law Bytes
Episode 111: The Story Behind JusTech - How Three University of Ottawa Law Students Created a Technology Compliance Solution for Privacy Breach Rules
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Show Notes

Privacy breaches have become increasingly commonplace as businesses of all sizes grapple with how to  keep customer information secure and what to do when things go wrong. The issue is particularly challenging for small and medium sized business, who are forced to navigate a regulatory framework that isn’t easy and can be extremely expensive. Enter JusTech, a project launched by Ritesh Kotak, Ayushi Dave, and Ryan Mosoff, three University of Ottawa law students who leveraged legal innovation hackathons to create a free online service that walks small businesses through the regulations and makes compliance manageable. I’ve been proud to serve as an advisor to JusTech, which provides some notable lessons on legal innovation and privacy law. Ritesh, Ayusha, and Ryan join the Law Bytes podcast to discuss.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Credits:

CBC News, How to Keep Your Information Secure Amid Data Breaches

Episode Transcript

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