Episode 101: OpenMedia's Laura Tribe on Digital Policy and the 2021 Canadian Election

September 20, 2021 00:43:08
Episode 101: OpenMedia's Laura Tribe on Digital Policy and the 2021 Canadian Election
Law Bytes
Episode 101: OpenMedia's Laura Tribe on Digital Policy and the 2021 Canadian Election
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Show Notes

It is election day in Canada following a late summer campaign in which the focus was largely anything but digital issues: COVID, climate change, Afghanistan, and affordability all dominated the daily talking points. The digital policy issues that grabbed attention throughout the spring – Bill C-10, online harms, wireless pricing – were largely absent from the discussion and in some cases even from party platforms. Laura Tribe, the executive director of OpenMedia, joins the Law Bytes podcast to discuss digital policies and the 2021 election campaign. Our conversation walks through a wide range of issues, including the surprising omission of wireless pricing from the Liberal platform, the future of Bill C-10, and the failure of privacy reform to garner much political traction.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Credits:

Global News, Canada Election: How are the Parties Planning to Tackle Cellphone Affordability

Episode Transcript

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