Episode 1: Welcome to LawBytes

October 20, 2021 00:02:24
Episode 1: Welcome to LawBytes
Law Bytes
Episode 1: Welcome to LawBytes
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Show Notes

In recent years the intersection between law, technology, and policy has exploded as digital policy has become a mainstream concern in Canada and around the world. I am very excited to announce the launch of LawBytes: A Podcast with Michael Geist. This podcast will explore digital policies in conversations with people studying the legal and policy challenges, setting the rules, or who are experts in the field. It will provide a Canadian perspective, but since the internet is global, examining international developments and Canada’s role in shaping global digital policy is be an important part of the story.

The preview episode is available now and first full episode – a conversation with UK Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham – will be available next week. All episodes will be available under a Creative Commons licence. You can subscribe at Apple Podcasts, Google Play, or Spotify as well as follow on Twitter at @LawBytesPod.

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Episode 79: David Kaye on the Challenges of Reconciling Freedom of Expression and the Regulation of Online Harms

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