Ep. 25: The CRTC Decision on Competitive Internet Pricing: A Conversation with George Burger

October 22, 2021 00:40:04
Ep. 25: The CRTC Decision on Competitive Internet Pricing: A Conversation with George Burger
Law Bytes
Ep. 25: The CRTC Decision on Competitive Internet Pricing: A Conversation with George Burger
/

Show Notes

Last month, Canada’s telecom regulator, the CRTC, issued its final decision in a lengthy battle over the rates that independent Internet providers pay for wholesale access to the broadband networks run by big incumbents such as Bell and Rogers. The Commission slashed previous rates and made its decision retroactive, an approach that sparked anger and lawsuits from the incumbents who are now in Canadian courts seeking to overturn the ruling and stop it from taking effect. Meanwhile, several Canadian independent ISPs wasted no time in responding to the decision, dropping their consumer prices and neatly illustrating the impact of lower rates and more competition. George Burger, one of the founders of vMedia and a frequent commentator on Canadian telecom issues, joined me on the podcast to discuss the decision and the state of competition for Canadian Internet services.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Burger, Big telcos have no business howling over CRTC decision that encourages fair internet prices
CRTC promotes competition for broadband Internet services by setting lower wholesale rates

Credits:

CBC News, Internet Price Hikes Coming for Canadians
The Lang & O’Leary Exchange – Usage Based Billing
CBC News, Bell to Cut 200,000 Customers From Internet Expansion After CRTC Decision
CityNews Toronto, NDP Promising to Put Cap on Cellphone, Internet Bills

Other Episodes

Episode

October 22, 2021 00:29:13
Episode Cover

Episode 19: Canada's Quiet Success Story: Irene Berkowitz on the Canadian YouTube Creative Sector

Canadian Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez recently appeared to pre-empt the government’s broadcast and telecommunications legislative review panel in his response to the panel’s interim report. Rodriguez indicated that the government will move to mandate new contributions and Cancon requirements for online services regardless of what the panel recommends. New creators leveraging online platforms don’t typically participate in government consultations, but that doesn’t mean their voice and experience should be ignored. Ryerson’s Irene Berkowitz recently released Watchtime Canada, a report on the role YouTube plays in fostering opportunities for creators. The study found an eco-system that provides thousands of Canadians with full-time employment opportunities and export strategies that outshine the traditional creative sector.  She joins me on the podcast this week to discuss the report and what it might mean for Canadian cultural policy. The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. The transcript is posted at the bottom of this post or can be accessed here. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod. Episode Notes: Watchtime Canada report Credits: Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage, May 2, 2019 Unbox Therapy, This Smartphone Changes Everything Gigi Gorgeous, This is Everything How to Cake It, GIANT Juice Box Cake with JUICE INSIDE The Icing Artist, Mini ANIMAL CAKES Vanoss Gaming Transcript: ...

Listen

Episode

January 31, 2022 00:25:14
Episode Cover

Episode 115: Reuven Avi-Yonah on the Past, Present and Future of Digital Services Taxes

There has been mounting concern over the past few years over whether some of the world’s largest companies – primarily big tech – pay their fair share of taxes. This issue has arisen in countries around the world leading to new digital services taxes that primarily target the U.S. tech giants and which in turn often leads to the U.S. threatening to retaliate in response. Canada now finds itself embroiled in these battles as Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland has proposed a retroactive digital services tax to take effect in 2024 if by that time a newly reached OECD agreement has not taken effect. Professor Reuven Avi-Yonah is a law professor at the University of Michigan and director of the school’s international tax LLM program.  He joins the Law Bytes podcast to discuss digital services taxes, the OECD deal, and what might happen if the international agreement falls apart. The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod. Credits: CNBC International, What is a Digital Tax? ...

Listen

Episode

April 25, 2022 00:17:17
Episode Cover

Episode 126: Why Canada's Online Harms Consultation Was a Transparency and Policy Failure

This week’s Law Bytes podcast departs from the typical approach as this past week was anything but typical. As readers of this blog will know, last week I obtained access to hundreds of previously secret submissions to the government’s online harms consultation. Those submissions cast the process in a new light. This week’s Law Bytes podcast explains why the online harms consultation was a transparency and policy failure, walking through what has happened, what we know now,  and how this fits within the broader Internet regulation agenda of the Canadian government. The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod. Show Notes: Online Harms Consultation ATIP Results Credits: Canada 2020, Democracy in the Digital Age: Addressing Online Harms ...

Listen