Episode 55: Mutale Nkonde on Racial Justice, Bias, and Technology

October 28, 2021 00:35:49
Episode 55: Mutale Nkonde on Racial Justice, Bias, and Technology
Law Bytes
Episode 55: Mutale Nkonde on Racial Justice, Bias, and Technology
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Show Notes

The world has been focused for the past several weeks on racial justice and the Black Lives Matter movement, with millions around the world taking to the streets to speak out against inequality and racism. Technology and concerns about racism and bias have been part of the discussion, with some of the world’s leading technology companies changing longstanding policies and practices. IBM has put an end all research, development and production of facial recognition technologies, while both Amazon and Microsoft said they would no longer sell the technology to local police departments.

Mutale Nkonde
 is an artificial intelligence policy analyst and a fellow at both the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and at Stanford University’s Digital Civil Society Lab. She joins me on the podcast this week from a busy home in Brooklyn, NY to talk about this moment in racial justice and technology, racial literacy, and the concerns about bias in artificial intelligence

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Daniels, Nkonde and Darakhshan, Advancing Racial Literacy in Tech

Credits:

France 24 English, Black Lives Matter Movement Gains Momentum Worldwide with Fresh Weekend of Protests
“Coded Bias”: New Film Looks at Fight Against Racial Bias in Facial Recognition & AI Technology

Episode Transcript

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