Episode 3: The Least They Can Get Away With

October 20, 2021 00:32:07
Episode
Law Bytes
Episode 3: The Least They Can Get Away With
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Show Notes

Earlier this month, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains took his most significant policy step to date to put his stamp on the Canadian telecom sector by issuing a proposed policy direction to the CRTC based on competition, affordability, consumer interests, and innovation. To help sort through the policy direction, the state of the Canadian telecom market, the role of independent companies that rely on regulated wholesale access, and lingering frustration with the CRTC, this week’s LawBytes podcast features a conversation with Andy Kaplan-Myrth, Vice President of Regulatory and Carrier Affairs with TekSavvy, Canada’s largest independent telecom company. 

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Episode Notes:

Enough is Enough: Bains Proposes CRTC Policy Direction Grounded in Competition, Affordability, and Consumer Interests

Credits:

Government Orders CRTC To Reverse Bandwidth Decision, The Hill Watcher, 3 February 2011

New wireless spectrum auction announced, Global News, 12 January 2014

Why is Canada-based Ting is not available for cell phone users in Canada?, Open Media, 1 August 2013

Verizon opts out of Canada, Canoe, 20 March 2018

House of Commons Hansard, 26 February 2019

House of Commons Hansard, 7 December 2018

Episode Transcript

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