Episode 2: It’s Time to Modernize the Laws

October 20, 2021 00:26:24
Episode 2: It’s Time to Modernize the Laws
Law Bytes
Episode 2: It’s Time to Modernize the Laws
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Show Notes

The first full length episode of the new LawBytes podcast features a conversation with UK Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham, who leads the high profile investigation into Facebook and Cambridge Analytica. Denham, who previously served as Assistant Commissioner with the federal privacy office and as the British Columbia Information and Privacy Commissioner, reflected on her years in Canada, particularly the Canadian Facebook investigation and concerns with the Google Buzz service. Denham emphasized the need for Canadian legislative reform in order to address today’s privacy challenges. Denham was recently appointed chair of the International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners, which she expects will increasingly focus on global privacy standards.

The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

 

Episode Notes:

12th Annual Deirdre Martin Lecture on Privacy

Credits:

#CambridgeAnalytica: ‘Data crimes are real crimes’ Denham, EU Reporter, 4 June 2018

Facebook Privacy Concerns, CBC News: The National, 17 July 2009

Privacy commissioner urges legislative reform in the wake of Facebook data scandal, CBC News, 17 April 2018

News Update: Google (NASDAQ:GOOG) Unveils Google Buzz: Social Networking for Gmail, TradetheTrend, 9 February 2010

Cambridge Analytica: Whistleblower reveals data grab of 50 million Facebook profiles, Channel 4 News, 17 March 2018

 

Episode Transcript

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