Episode 126: Why Canada's Online Harms Consultation Was a Transparency and Policy Failure

April 25, 2022 00:17:17
Episode
Law Bytes
Episode 126: Why Canada's Online Harms Consultation Was a Transparency and Policy Failure
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Show Notes

This week’s Law Bytes podcast departs from the typical approach as this past week was anything but typical. As readers of this blog will know, last week I obtained access to hundreds of previously secret submissions to the government’s online harms consultation. Those submissions cast the process in a new light. This week’s Law Bytes podcast explains why the online harms consultation was a transparency and policy failure, walking through what has happened, what we know now,  and how this fits within the broader Internet regulation agenda of the Canadian government.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes:

Online Harms Consultation ATIP Results

Credits:

Canada 2020, Democracy in the Digital Age: Addressing Online Harms

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