Episode 110: Waiting to Connect - Karen Barnes and Catherine Middleton on the CCA's Report on Internet Access in Canadian Rural, Remote and Indigenous Communities

November 29, 2021 00:41:02
Episode
Law Bytes
Episode 110: Waiting to Connect - Karen Barnes and Catherine Middleton on the CCA's Report on Internet Access in Canadian Rural, Remote and Indigenous Communities
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Show Notes

Canada’s strategy to ensure that everyone from coast to coast to coast has access to affordable high speed Internet services is widely viewed as a failure and the source of ongoing frustration for many, particularly those in rural, remote and indigenous communities. Those communities often face the prospect of no broadband access or at best expensive, unreliable services. The Council of Canadian Academies recently convened an expert panel on High-Throughput Networks for Rural and Remote Communities in Canada.

The panel’s report is a must read for anyone concerned with equitable and affordable Internet access and the consequences of leaving many communities – particularly indigenous communities – behind. The panel was chaired by Karen Barnes, the former president of Yukon University and included Professor Catherine Middleton, the Director of the Ted Rogers School of Information Technology Management at Ryerson University. They join the Law Bytes podcast this week  to discuss the panel, the report, and the recommendations for policy action.

The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.

Show Notes

CCA Report, Waiting to Connect: The Expert Panel on High-Throughput Networks for Rural and Remote Communities in Canada

Credits:

CBC News, Digital Divide May Impact the Future of Indigenous Youth

Episode Transcript

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