Law Bytes

In recent years the intersection between law, technology, and policy has exploded as digital policy ... more

Latest Episodes

October 28, 2021 00:45:22
Episode 73: The Broadcasting Act Blunder - Why Minister Guilbeault is Wrong

Episode 73: The Broadcasting Act Blunder - Why Minister Guilbeault is Wrong

Canada is currently considering major reforms to how it regulates Internet services. Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault’s Bill C-10 would dramatically reshape the Broadcasting Act by regulating foreign Internet sites and services with the prospect of mandated registration, payments to support Canadian content, confidential data disclosures, and discoverability requirements. The bill would also remove policies supporting Canadian ownership of the broadcasting system and reduce expectations about Canadian participation in film and television productions. This week’s Law Bytes podcast takes a closer look at the implications of the bill, examining key concerns discussed in my ongoing Broadcasting Act blunder blog series. The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod. Show Notes: Broadcasting Act Blunder series Day 1: Why there is no Canadian Content Crisis Day 2: What the Government Doesn’t Say About Creating a “Level Playing Field” Day 3: Minister Guilbeault Says Bill C-10 Contains Economic Thresholds That Limit Internet Regulation. It Doesn’t Day 4: Why Many News Sites are Captured by Bill C-10 Day 5: Narrow Exclusion of User Generated Content Services Day 6: The Beginning of the End of Canadian Broadcast Ownership and Control Requirements, Day 7: Beware Bill C-10’s Unintended Consequences Day 8: The Unnecessary Discoverability Requirements Day 9: Why Use Cross-Subsidies When the Government is Rolling out Tech Tax Policies? Day 10: Downgrading the Role of Canadians in their Own Programming Day 11: The “Regulate Everything” Approach ...

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October 28, 2021 00:33:45
Episode 72: Emily Laidlaw on the Good, the Bad, and the Missed Opportunities Behind Canada's Privacy Reform

Episode 72: Emily Laidlaw on the Good, the Bad, and the Missed Opportunities Behind Canada's Privacy Reform

Canada’s new privacy bill is only a couple of weeks old but it is already generating debate in the House of Commons and careful study and commentary from the privacy community. As the biggest overhaul of Canada’s privacy rules in two decades, the bill will undoubtedly be the subject of deep analysis and lengthy committee review, likely to start early in 2021. Last week’s Law Bytes podcast featured Navdeep Bains, the Innovation, Science and Industry Minister, who is responsible for the bill. This week, Professor Emily Laidlaw of the University of Calgary, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Cybersecurity Law, joins the podcast with her take on the good, the bad, and the missed opportunities in Bill C-11. The podcast can be downloaded here, accessed on YouTube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify, Youtube or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod.   Show Notes: Laidlaw, AB Lawg: Canada’s Proposed New Consumer Privacy Protection Act: The Good, the Bad, the Missed Opportunities Credits: CTV News, Government Introduces Privacy Bill ...

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October 28, 2021 00:23:37
Episode 71: Minister Navdeep Bains on Canada's New Privacy Bill

Episode 71: Minister Navdeep Bains on Canada's New Privacy Bill

It has taken many years, but Canada finally appears ready to engage in an overhaul of its outdated private sector privacy law. Earlier this month, the Innovation, Science and Industry Minister Navdeep Bains introduced Bill C-11, which, if enacted, would fundamentally re-write Canada’s privacy rules. The government intends to repeal PIPEDA and replace it with the Consumer Privacy Protection Act, which features a new privacy tribunal, tough penalties for non-compliance, and new provisions on issues such as data portability and data de-identification. To discuss the thinking behind the bill and the government’s privacy plans for privacy, Minister Bains this week joins the Law Bytes podcast as he identifies some the benefits of the bill, clarifies the reasoning behind some of the more controversial policy decisions, and provides a roadmap for what comes next. The podcast can be downloaded here, streamed on Youtube, and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod. Credits: Prime Minister of Canada, Remarks Updating Canadians on the COVID-19 Situation and new Privacy Protections ...

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October 28, 2021 00:39:00
Episode 70:

Episode 70: "It's Massive Free Distribution" - Village Media's Jeff Elgie on Why His Company Opposes Lobbying Efforts to Establish a Licence for Linking to News Stories

News Media Canada, the lobby group representing the major newspaper publishers in Canada recently launched a new campaign that calls for the creation of a government digital media regulatory agency that would have the power to establish mandated payments by Internet companies merely for linking to news articles. But not everyone in the sector – or even within News Media Canada – agrees with the position. Jeff Elgie is the CEO and majority shareholder of Village Media, a digital-only media organization that operates local news and community websites throughout Ontario. He joins the Law Bytes podcast this week to talk about operating local news sites in the current environment, why he welcomes referral traffic from companies like Facebook and Google, and why though he respects News Media Canada, he hopes that a new association will emerge that better represents the diversity of news media in Canada. The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod. Credits: Global News, Letting Tech Giants Like Facebook Regulate Themselves ‘Simply not Working’ Says Minister ...

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October 28, 2021 00:41:18
Episode 69: Bram Abramson on the Government's Plan to Regulate Internet Streaming Services

Episode 69: Bram Abramson on the Government's Plan to Regulate Internet Streaming Services

Last week, Canadian Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault introduced Bill C-10, legislation that would significantly reform Canada’s Broadcasting Act. A foundational part of what he has called a “get money from web giants” legislative strategy, the bill grants new powers to the CRTC to regulate online streaming services. Bram Abramson is one of Canada’s leading communications law lawyers and managing director of a new digital risk and rights strategy firm called 32M. Bram acted as an outside consultant on telecom regulation for the recent Broadcasting and Telecommunications Legislative Review panel – often called the Yale Report –  but he joins the podcast to talk about the past, present and future of broadcast regulation, in particular what Bill C-10 could mean for the regulation of online streaming services. The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod. Credits: CPAC, Heritage Minister Discusses Bill to Update Broadcasting Act – November 3, 2020 ...

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October 28, 2021 00:30:38
Episode 68: Mike Pal on What the Canadian Experience Teaches About the Intersection Between Election Law and the Internet

Episode 68: Mike Pal on What the Canadian Experience Teaches About the Intersection Between Election Law and the Internet

The world will be focused on the United States this week as the U.S. Presidential election is slated to take place on Tuesday, November 3rd. The role of social media has been in the spotlight in the US for months with calls for regulation, a range of responses from the major companies, and ongoing concerns about the immediate aftermath of the election and fears that their platforms could be weaponized if the winner is in dispute. Canada had its own national election one year ago and enacted a range of reforms designed to address some of these issues. Mike Pal is a colleague at the University of Ottawa where he specializes in election law. He joins the Law Bytes podcast to discuss the Canadian experience including what changes were made, whether they were effective, what more can be done, and what Canada might teach others about confronting the challenges that lie at the intersection between elections and the Internet. The podcast can be downloaded here and is embedded below. Subscribe to the podcast via Apple Podcast, Google Play, Spotify or the RSS feed. Updates on the podcast on Twitter at @Lawbytespod. Show Notes: Michael Pal, Social Media and Democracy: Challenges for Election Law and Administration in Canada Credits: CTV News, Facebook is “Clear and Present Danger’ to Democracies: Technology Analyst ...

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